Energy Efficiency Badge

Nov 10, 2020 | Energy Efficiency | 21 comments

Prep Your Home for Winter Energy Savings

Small changes = Big savings

It’s not too late to prep your home for winter energy savings. All it takes is several small changes to achieve big savings for you and your family.

Capture the sun’s light and heat. During the day, leave your curtains and blinds open to illuminate your rooms naturally and gain warmth from the sun. At night, close your curtains and blinds to prevent that free heat from escaping.

Prevent fireplace heat loss. When you’re not using your fireplace, keep the damper closed so warm air doesn’t escape through the chimney. Energy-efficient fireplace grates also help you save by pulling cool air out of your room and into the fireplace, while bringing warm air back in the room.

Reverse the direction of your ceiling fans. Sometimes we forget that ceiling fans are just as important for keeping you warm as they are for keeping you cool. Flip the switch to change the direction of the blades so they spin clockwise, which will push warm air downward.

Adjust the thermostat according to the time of day. When you’re home and awake, set the heat as low as it feels comfortable. Aim for 68 degrees as an optimal temperature. Wearing warmer clothing or grabbing a blanket can help keep you cozy. Then, while you’re sleeping or out of the house, lower the thermostat by 10 to 15 degrees. Doing so for at least 8 hours can save around 10% on your heating bill. A programmable thermostat will make it easy to save. You also don’t have to heat all rooms equally. Using an energy-efficient space heater in your most common rooms allows you to keep the main temperature lower.

Winterize your windows and doors. First, if you haven’t removed any window air conditioning units, do that now! Next, you’ll want to inspect all your doors, windows and ductwork for gaps that could leak heat from your home. Many of these cracks and leaks can easily be fixed with caulk and weatherstripping, which can add up to a lot of savings.

Following these energy-efficiency tips can help you save. For more info on our tools, tips, and programs, visit savewithppl.com.

 

21 Comments

  1. Luis Lopez Santiago

    Mi esposa y yo somos personas citysen de 64 y65 años y necesito hayuda con el pago de energía eléctrica gracias mi dirección es 2 Maryland circle apt 234 Whitehall PA 18052 .

    Reply
    • Kathryn

      Muchas gracias por llamar a PPL. Lo siento, pero no hay nadie que puede “Chat” contigo en espanol. Podemos ayudarte si llamas a 1-800-342-5775. Tenemos representates que puede communicar en espanol.

      Reply
  2. Charles R. Kertell

    I received an email that implies I have a PP&L account, which I have not had for 8 years. This is the first email I have received from PP&L in 8 years. Please explain.

    Reply
    • Kathryn

      Good Afternoon Charles, Please call our Billing Team @ 1-800-342-5775 option 2 (available weekdays 8am-5pm) to assist you with the email you received. The Representative may need to remove your email address from our system to prevent future emails. They can also provide account information to put your mind at ease. Thank you!

      Reply
  3. Jean Rowe

    I am questioning the advice you posted on setting back your heat 10-15 degrees. That sounds excessive. And maybe that’s ok with a gas or oil system, but with heat pumps or geothermal, the recovery from being set back so far would cause the emergency heat coil to be used. Would probably negate any savings. Would you check with heat pump/geothermal experts and post specific advice on those systems? Thanks

    Reply
    • Kathryn

      Good Evening Jean, This is an excellent point and we are happy you questioned it. We did some research and agree that setback of the thermostat with a heat pump or geothermal might actually be an energy waster. The amount of energy needed to reheat the house and stabilize the temperature would be more than the savings. While heat pumps are very efficient, there is a tradeoff for this efficiency. The air supplied from heat pumps is generally cooler than air supplied from standard electric resistance, gas or oil heaters. This means it takes longer for a heat pump to heat up your house after a setback period as well as the high risk of the heat pump going into the costly emergency override. Thank you for your feedback!

      Reply
      • Giovanni

        Kathryn,

        I’ve read that heat pumps are not very effective when the outside ambient temperature falls below 30 degrees F. I find that my heat pump’s Auxiliary mode is activated and it seems, to me, that the pump never goes off during the night. Is this normal or does it indicate that there may be something wrong? Any suggestions / recommendations for a reliable heat pump repair company?

        Thanks
        Giovanni

        Reply
        • Kathryn

          Good Evening Giovanni, Wondering if we make your question visible, others may respond with some answers. We are an electric distribution company and do not have recommendations for heat pump repair companies.

          Reply
        • Lawrence E Galcher

          Heat pumps just don’t work with the temp over 30 degrees, can’t generate effort heat– worthless in the Northeast. I was scammed into one with a $ 10,000 10 yr. interest free loan. This was to improve my electric baseboard heat. Total scam and the state of NJ don’t know it???? Baloney. Furthermore, electric prices increased every year in the winter because air conditioning usage decreases, so retirees with electric heat get screwed with no recourse in the winter. Finally there was a Municipal Co-op you form to negotiate prices. That worked somewhat in the users favor. Amen

          1

          Reply
        • Anonymous

          Newer heat pumps do not have this issue. I live in Maine and heat pumps are everywhere.

          Reply
      • Lawrence E Galcher

        Heat pumps don’t work efficiently when the outside temp is above 30. They are a total waste of money in the NE. I was scammed into one with 10yr $10,000 interest free loan. A total waste of 10G’s. Furthermore, Utility companies raise electric prices in the winter because air conditioning usage falls and electric home heating people get screw, mostly retirees who have no recourse.

        4

        Reply
  4. CECELIA R DANDO

    thank you

    Reply
  5. carlos cortes

    good advice I will keep them on mind

    Reply
  6. Kevin Takacs

    I’m on the electric bill savings program and it’s wonderful.I used more electric last month due to my furnace not working properly or at all , so I had to use space heaters.I am going to have to probably use space heaters again , I can’t afford to have it fixed.I’ve done everything to fix it but I’m not having any luck. If ppl knows anyone that repaired furnaces for a low cost , I would be most greatful to find out. My email is Kevmark40@yahoo.com Thanks

    Reply
  7. R.Shawn mccleaf

    Hello, which position should my ceiling fan switch be in for winter? should the switch be up or down,as i am not very well with which direction it should be turning

    Reply
    • Kathryn

      Good Afternoon Shawn, Excellent question as most customers underutilize fans during the winter. During winter, you should run your ceiling fans in the clockwise direction. During summer, you should run your ceiling fans in the counterclockwise direction. You can read more under https://www.ceilingfan.com. Thanks for checking with us!

      Reply
  8. Charles Edward Roehm

    Good information provided.

    Reply
  9. NICOLE NEUBAUER

    .

    Reply
  10. Sherry

    I have electric heat and central air in each room I have wall air return vents someone told me to close the top vent in winter and open the lower vents this true .

    Reply
  11. Kamal Ud Din Zia

    Hi. I need to apply for LIHEAP. Please send me link to enable me to apply for LIHEAP. Thanks

    Reply
    • Kathryn

      Good Afternoon Kamal, Please submit your LIHEAP application under https://www.pplelectric.com/liheap. You can also reach the LIHEAP Hotline at 1-866-857-7095. Thanks for checking with us!

      Reply

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